It’s Our Privilege – The Multilift and the WWII Memorial

The town of Worcester Massachusetts made many sacrifices during World War 2, as did many others who were alive during this time. Worcester, lovingly referred to as the “Heart of the Commonwealth” sent 24,000 soldiers to the war; many of whom never made it back home. The members of the community that did not leave for war contributed in their own way with 80 percent working in war-related jobs such as preparing and delivering clothing, boots, and artillery. The war affected so many that in 2008, 70 years after the end of the war, the town constructed a WWII monument in honor of all its veterans and war supporters.

Now in 2016, nearly 6 years later, this monument is seeing a major face-lift thanks to the major’s request for its enhancement in a BIG way. Originally, 6 very large and heavy granite piers surrounded a brick patio of sorts. Moving these piers was no easy task. Each required removal and placement to the side at the start of the project. This is where the Kenco Multilift came into play. Its scissor-style grip allowed for the workers to carefully clamp onto each piece. The pads gripped snugly without marring the surface which was of great importance. Each pier was then lifted safely out of the way.

Also needing removal were the granite steps that surrounded the perimeter of the original structure. The versatility of the American-made Multilift proved its value yet again. With a minor adjustment of the legs on either side of the lifter, the grip range was now suitable for the width of these steps. Each step was picked up using only one machine operator and a worker to help guide them.

As quickly as the monument was de-constructed, it was re-constructed. However, this time it was given some very unique and inspiring additions. For instance, 60 water jets were centrally installed. 2 large jets represented the Atlantic and Pacific, 6 medium jets stood for the six military branches, and the remainder were devoted to Worcester residents who lost their life in the war. Each pier was stamped with the seal of each of the military branches. There was also installation of additional monuments with the names of each and every Worcester veteran’s name.

June 4th, 2016 – the dedication event is in full swing. Veterans from town find their way to this new and improved monument, constructed with love and respect for their sacrifices. The National Anthem is sung by Eric Jaeger and rings in the day’s events. A time capsule becomes a vessel of truth with letters of veterans placed in it, not to be opened and read for another 100 years. Imagine the stories! Some stand, some lean upon their canes, others sit in their wheelchairs as they cast their eyes upon this beauty of a memorial, devoted solely to them. It’s a day to never forget and projects like the never go to wayside for us. It is with great respect, admiration and pride that we continue to serve those that serve us. Thank you for choosing our Multilift to help with your project and Thank You to our veterans for your continued service.

*We realize some of the images do not include the Multilift. Although we hope to show the relevance of our equipment to any project, we felt as though the scope of the project required even more focus than our attempt at a sales pitch. (Non-Multilift) Picture credit: WorcesterMag.com 

Kenco Pipe Lift in Colombia

Butler Tech setting pipe in Columbia

PL2250 to set the Surelock pipe system in Columbia        PL2250 in Columbia

Kenco PL2250 Pipe Lifts are being used on the largest project currently underway in Colombia, South America. This is the first project where they have laid this size of pipe in Colombia utilizing the Surelock mechanical pipe joint system. Butler Tech has been contracted for the project, and they are seen in the photos working near the coastal village of Tolu.

Gabe Guevara of Surelock had this to say about our product: ‘Thought you might to see your Pipe Lifts in action. They work great. Best and safest lifts we’ve ever used. These lifts have increased our productivity by more than 25%, and we’ve received praise from our client for the safety and ease of operation. We are extremely proud of these lifts.’

 

Horse power is still used in construction in Tolu, Columbia           The coastal village of Tolu, Columbia

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Renovation Project 2013

DFW International Airport is undergoing a massive seven year – $900 million dollar terminal renovation project. One of the tasks is to connect the airport to downtown Dallas via the DART rail, which is a light rail system. The DART will run between Northbound Service Road and Northbound International Parkway, and under Taxiway Yankee and Taxiway Zulu at the North end of the airport. Due to the type of work that needs to be accomplished, multiple lane closures are needed in various phases throughout the project

Phillips May Corporation of Dallas, Texas assisted with the project. In June and July 2013, development included lane closures of the 3 lane Northbound Service Road . Thirty-foot concrete traffic barriers (CTB) were delivered to the site on flat bed semi trucks. Using two Gehl telescopic handlers that were each fitted with a Kenco KL 9000 Barrier Lift, the wall segments were removed in unison from the truck beds.

The Kenco Barrier Lifts made a light task of what could have been heavy work. The CTB was picked up and placed in desired location, while flaggers were able to maintain one clear traffic lane during the operation.

One concern that was encountered was how to place and align the CTB under the overpasses of the Taxiways. The low height considerations posed a possibility of the machine damaging the overhead structure. To add to the challenge, the roadway converges to only two lanes at these points, and the airport still required that one lane remain open for traffic.

Once again, the Kenco Barrier Lift resolved the situation. A KL 30000 was chosen to handle the wall capacity and it was attached to a Volvo 320 excavator. Tyson Proovost operated the Volvo, maneuvering it along the future rail path and setting the CTB into position without disrupting the traffic flow.